Trees

The Aesculus glabra

The Aesculus glabra, commonly known as the Ohio Buckeye tree is a part of the Hippocastanaceae family. You can see that the Ohio Buckeye tree leaves have an opposite or subopposite leaf arrangement and is palmately compound. Their leaflet margins are serrated with an elliptic leaflet shape. This Aesculus glabra is near the riverbank of the Olentangy Trail, located in Worthington, Ohio.

The Aesculus glabra is native to North America. It can grow to be 50-70 feet tall and have a canopy of 40-50 feet wide. It is one of the first trees to shed its leaves in the fall. The leaves and trigs of this tree have an unpleased scent when broken, which is put out as a warning due to it being poisonous. Squirrels like the fruit of this tree, the buckeye nut.

There were no Buckeye nuts, which made me second guess myself that it was a Buckeye tree because the nut is the one thing that grantees it is a Buckeye tree. It was the only thing I could 100% associate with a Buckeye tree.

Squirrels are one of the only animals that are able to eat a buckeye without the poisonous effect(s). The leaves, nuts and bark of the Aesculus glabra is toxic to all animals expect squirrels. (https://www.dispatch.com/article/20150925/LIFESTYLE/309259671)

The Acer saccharinum L.

The Acer saccharinum L., commonly known as the Silver Maple tree is a part of the Aceraceae family. You can see that the Silver Maple tree leaves have a opposite and subopposite leaf arrangement and is simple. Their leaf margins are incised; parted with a star-shape leaf. This Acer saccharinum L. was found near the entrance of the trail, not close to other trees in the Olentangy Trail, located in Worthington, Ohio.

The Acer saccharinum L. can grow to be 80-100 feet tall and have a trunk diameter of 5-6 feet wide with a vase shape canopy. This tree can grow in areas most other trees cannot. The Silver Maple prefers to be located in moist/wet areas.

When walking the Trail, I was able to locate a lot of Silver Maple trees. As I walked deeper and deeper into the forest and away from the river, I was unable tp locate anymore Maple trees. I needed to take another photo of the Silver Maple tree because the first one I took was blurry. I looked and looked and wasn’t able to locate a single one!

The Silver Maple tree is used to produce maple syrup and iss sap is fed upon by small insects, such as moths and mosquitoes. (https://homeguides.sfgate.com/insects-infesting-silver-maple-trees-90841.html)

The Fraxinus americana

The Fraxinus americana, commonly known as the White Ash or American Ash is a part of the Oleaceae family. You can see that the White ash leaves have an opposite and subopposite arrangement and is odd pinnately compound. Their leaflet margins are entire and serrulate with a lanceolate, ovate leaflet shape. This Fraxinus Americana was found uphill of the riverbanks in the Olentangy Trail, located in Worthington, Ohio.

The Fraxinus Americana is native to North America and can grow to be 50-80 feet tall with a canopy of 40-60 feet wide. and grows in a pyramid shape as a quick rate. It produces seeds every 2-3 years that many birds like to eat. The White Ash likes sunny locations.

This White Ash was hard to distinguish between other Ash trees like Green and Black Ash. I noticed that the White Ash tree leaflets had a dull or whitened underside while the Black Ash did not have a stalk and the Green Ash had shorter stalks than the White Ash and they have no dull underside.

White Ash trees provide less light availability to the interior forest. Without the Ash trees providing high canopies to the forest, the light availability can provide increase tree growth for invasive plants. (https://www.nps.gov/articles/ash-tree-update.htm)

The Castanea pumila

The Castanea pumila, commonly known as the Allegheny chinquapin or dwarf chestnut is a part of the Fagaceae family. You can see that the Allegheny chinquapin tree leaves gave an alternate leaf arrangement and is simple. Their leaf margins are toothed with an elliptical or oblong leaf shape. The Castanea pumila is located off the trails from the Olentangy Trail in a field, located in Worthington, Ohio.

The Castanea pumila can grow to be 30-50 feet tall. The Allegheny chinkapin likes dry locations and well-drained soil.

I knew he was a superstar when I saw him because of his waxy leaves. The waxy leaves make the tree appear as fake plant like.

Chinkapin nuts can be eaten by both humans and other wildlife, such as blue jays and turkey. The nut has a sweet flavor. The wood of this tree is often used for fences and fuel. (https://plants.ces.ncsu.edu/plants/castanea-pumila/)

The Quercus Rubra

The Quercus Rubra, commonly known as the Northern Red Oak is a part of the Fagaceae family. You can see that the Northern Red Oak tree leaves have an alternate leaf arrangement and is simple. Their leaf margins are lobed and parted with an elliptic or oblong leaf shape. This Quercus Rubra is on the riverbank at the Olentangy Trail, in Worthington, Ohio.

The Quercus rubra is native to North America and can grow as tall as 6—70 feet and have a canopy of 40-60 feet wide. Is located in rich woodlands and can sometimes reach up to 90 feet tall.

The Quercus rubra proved hard to identify. Its leaflets spoke oak, its arrangement said otherwise. However, he is just a baby and is still growing, he has not yet reached his full potential.

The Northern Red Oak tree gives nesting areas for birds as well as, provides covers for animals like deer and rabbits. The acorn from the Oak tree provides food for wildlife like birds and smaller mammals like squirrels. (https://plants.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/cs_quru.pdf)

The Gleditsia triacanthos

The Gleditsia triacanthos, commonly known as the Thorny honey locust tree is a part of the Fabaceae family. You can see that the the Honey Locust tree leaves have an alternate leaf arrangement and is (bi)pinnately compound. Their leaf margin is serrated with a lanceolate leaflet shape. This Gleditsia triacanthos is located near the riverbank of the Olentangy Trail, located in Worthington, Ohio.

The Gleditsia triacanthos can grow to be 66 feet tall, their growth is fast and can live to 120 years old. Young honey locust leaves are bipinnately, while older are pinnately. They prefer moist soil near riverbeds; however, it is adaptable to different types of environments.

The Gleditsia triacanthos was located frequently throughout the Olentangy Trail forest. Because it was located in many different locations, I found myself taking pictures of different Honey Locust trees. I thought they were different types of trees at the time. They were located near the river banks, as well as deeper within the forest.

The Gleditsia triacanthos provides protection to game animals like deer, as well as birds during hunting season because of the dense group of thorny vegetation that Honey Locust provides. (https://plants.usda.gov/factsheet/pdf/fs_gltr.pdf)

The Acer negundo

The Acer negundo, commonly known as the boxelder or ashleaf maple is a part of the Sapindaceae family. You can see that the boxelder tree leaves have a opposite feature compound leaf arrangement and is odd-pinnate. Their leaflet margins are serrated with a lanceolate; ovate leaflet shape. This Acwe negundo is located the riverbank of the Olentangy Trail, located in Worthington, Ohio.

The Acer negundo is 25-50 feet tall and its canopy 25-45 feet wide. The preferred habitat is wet land, such as riverbanks and floodplains, but can be found in drier lands.

These three crowned beauties threw me through a loop when trying to obtain a photo of him. Located off the trail right by the riverbed, I spotted him and made it my mission to get to him. Almost slipped into the water, but I got him!

The Acer negundo provides habitat for wildlife, such as birds and squirrels and protect livestock from the extreme (winter and summer) temperatures. They also have seeds that provide food for small mammals and birds. (https://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/plants/tree/aceneg/all.html)

The Tilia americana

The Tilia americana, commonly known as the American basswood or American linden is a part of the Tiliaceae family. You can see that the American linden tree leaves have an alternate leaf arrangement and is simple. Their leaf margins are serrated with a cordate ovate leaf shape. This Tilia americana is just off the riverbank in Olentangy Trail, located in Worthington, Ohio.

The Tilia americana can range as tall as 80-100 feet tall but is typically around 40-50 feet tall with a canopy from 35-40 feet wide. The leaves range from 4-8 inches long and are heart shaped. In spring, they bloom white/yellow fragrant clusters.

This heartthrob caught my eye just of the riverside trail and I couldn’t help but fall in love. I rushed over to capture true loves kiss with a  darling photo.

The Tilia americana is used by blue jays and other birds for shelter and their seeds.